Paradise Memorial Garden, Pueblo West

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  • Blanket Flower
    Blanket Flower
  • Butterfly Bush
    Butterfly Bush
  • Chives
    Chives
  • Cone Flower
    Cone Flower
  • Columbine
    Columbine
  • Catmint
    Catmint
  • Blanket Flower
    Blanket Flower
  • Aster
    Aster
Blanket Flower
Blanket Flower

Aspen ~

ABOUT THIS PLANT:  Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) are lovely in the wild, and enjoy the most extensive native range of any tree on the continent. Their leaves have flattened petioles, so they tremble in every light breeze. You may have admired aspens lighting up park slopes with brilliant yellow fall color.   Aspen trees grow very quickly and are very hardy. That means that you can “furnish” a new backyard in just a few seasons if you plant aspens. Aspens are small and won’t overwhelm your yard, and sometimes they provide nice autumn color. On the other hand, consider that the role of aspens in nature is as a “succession” tree. Its job in the wild is to spread quickly in eroded or burned out areas, providing cover for seedlings of forest trees like pine, fir and spruce. As the forest trees get bigger, the aspen die out.

PLANTING TIPS:   Try to pick nursery-grown specimens rather than those taken from the wild. Nursery grown trees require less quaking aspen tree care and may avoid some of the disease issues the tree experiences in cultivation. A large part of quaking aspen tree care involves selecting an appropriate planting location. Plant the trees in moist, well-drained soil. The soil should be slightly acidic for the tree to thrive. Plant aspens on northern or eastern slopes, or northern or eastern sides of your house, rather than sunnier areas. They cannot tolerate drought or hot, dry soil.


Aster ~

ABOUT THIS PLANT: Aster thrives in areas with cool, moist summers. It produces blue, white, or pink flowers in the late summer or fall. Plant height ranges from 8 inches to 8 feet, depending on variety. Tall varieties make good back-of-the-border plants and are also attractive planted in naturalized meadows. Aster is susceptible to powdery mildew and rust diseases, so choose disease-resistant varieties.Attracts butterflies.
PLANTING TIPS: Plant in spring, spacing plants 1 to 3 feet apart, depending on the variety. Prepare garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.
CARE:Apply a thin layer of compost each spring, followed by a 2-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. Pinch young shoots back to encourage bushiness. Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. Stake tall varieties to keep them upright. After the first killing frost, cut stems back to an inch or two above soil line. Divide plants every three to four years as new growth begins in the spring, lifting plants and dividing them into clumps containing three to five shoots.

Beardtongue ~
ABOUT THIS PLANT:  If you have gone hiking in areas of Mexico to western North America from May to August, you will have seen these attractive flowers. Penstemon plants are related to snapdragons and come in a variety of cultivated hues for the home gardener. The flowers are perfectly shaped to accommodate hummingbirds, who spend their nesting period at the Penstemon snack bar.  Each flower has five petals and they come in hues of lavender, salmon, pink, red and white. The stems are triangular and the leaves are arranged opposite with grayish green tones. Several different species exist and more are in cultivation. The exact shape of the leaves varies in each cultivar of Penstemon plants. They may be oval or sword shaped, smooth or waxy. Penstemon beard tongue is a commonly found perennial, which may also grow as an annual in chilly or excessively hot regions.
PLANTING TIPS:  he best location for your Penstemon is in a full sun area with well draining soil. Penstemon care and maintenance is minimal if the site and moisture requirements are met. Poorly draining soils and freezing temperatures while the plant is still active are the biggest causes of plant mortality. The perennial is remarkably tolerant of drought conditions and is a stalwart presence in even low nutrient soils. It has had to be adaptable to thrive in windy, exposed areas of mountain foothills. You can grow Penstemon from seed. They begin as rosettes low to the ground before forming the characteristic flower stalk. Indoor sowing should begin in late winter. Seedlings are ready to transplant when they have a second set of true leaves. Space Penstemon plants 1 to 3 feet apart and mix in a little compost at planting time to help conserve water and increase porosity.

Blanket Flower~
ABOUT THIS PLANT: Produced above a clump of hairy, narrow, gray-green leaves, the blossoms of perennial blanket flower have petals that may be solid colored shades of yellow, wine red , orange or peach, or may be banded in combinations of red or orange with yellow. The petals of some are frilled, while others have a unique, tubular shape. Sizes range from 10-12 inch high dwarfs to selections as tall as 24-30 inches. All are easy care plants with few insect or disease problems and most are hardy in zones 3-9. There is also an annual blanket flower (Gaillardia pulchella) that is easy to grow from seed. Start seeds early indoors 4-6 weeks before the last spring frost, transplanting to the garden when the weather has warmed. In warm-winter areas, sow seeds directly in late fall or very early spring. Varieties are available with single, double and semi-double flowers.Blanket flowers can be grown in containers, attract butterflies and the taller cultivars make nice cut flowers.
PLANTING TIPS:Full sun and very well-drained soil are musts for blanket flowers to thrive. They prefer loose, sandy soil that isn't overly fertile with a pH near neutral or slightly alkaline. Established plants are quite drought tolerant.Container grown plants can be set out throughout the growing season, but spring or fall planting is ideal. Space dwarf cultivars about a foot apart; taller varieties should be set about 18 inches apart. Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.
CARE:Deadhead plants regularly to encourage more flowering. Blanket flowers are often relatively short-lived. Cutting back clumps to 6 inches in late summer often increases their chances of winter survival. You can also keep your plants vigorous by dividing them every 2-3 years in spring or early fall. Water newly set out or divided plants regularly until they become established. Blanket flowers have few insect or disease problems. Watch for aphids and leafhoppers that can spread a virus-like disease called aster yellows. Control insects with insecticidal soap, if needed, and destroy any plants that are stunted with flowers that remain green, as these are infected with aster yellows.

Burning Bush ~
ABOUT THIS PLANT:  

This sensational fall favorite makes a dramatic accent as a hedge, in a mixed shrub border, grouped into a mass planting, or near water where the brilliant read color can be reflected; however, take care to avoid planting in heavy clay or very wet areas. The shrub grows best in well-drained soil and in a sunny location, but it will produce good fall color even if planted in a heavily shaded area. If possible, plant the shrub where there is good air circulation so the leaves dry quickly. This will minimize disease problems.

PLANTING TIPS: 

Measure the width of the root ball, container, or bare-root spread and multiply that measurement by 3 times to find the diameter of the planting hole. The planting hole should be large enough to allow the entire root system to be covered. The plant should be set into the planting hole with the crown at the same depth it was growing in the nursery, where the roots and top growth join, just at the soil surface. Loosen the root system and position the plant so that the uppermost roots will be covered with soil. Be careful not to let the roots dry out during the planting process. To prevent your shrub from settling lower in the soil after planting, never dig the center of the planting hole deeper than the height of the root ball.

After planting, press the soil back in firmly around the roots and water thoroughly, until the soil cannot readily absorb any more water.


Butterfly Bush ~

ABOUT THIS PLANT: It is a delight to watch all types of butterflies sip nectar from the abundant flowers on this aptly named shrub.Butterfly bush is a large, arching shrub that produces masses of flowers in midsummer to fall. Flower colors include blue, pink, red, violet, yellow, and white, and the shrub grows 5 to 10 feet tall and wide, depending on the variety. Butterfly bushes grow well in shrub or perennial borders, and the fragrant flowers can be used for cutting. True to its name, the Butterfly Bush attracts butterflies.
PLANTING TIPS: Select a site with full sun and moist, well-drained soil.Plant in spring or fall, spacing plants 5 to 10 feet apart, depending on the variety. Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the rootball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the rootball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.

CARE:Apply a thin layer of compost each spring, followed by a 2- to 4-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. Flowers are produced on new wood, so prune back old growth almost to the ground early each spring before any new growth emerges.


Carpet Bugle~

ABOUT THIS PLANT:  When you’re looking for something attractive to quickly fill in a large area, then you can’t go wrong with ajuga (Ajuga reptans), also known as carpet bugleweed. This creeping evergreen plant quickly fills in empty areas, smothering out weeds while adding exceptional foliage color and blooms. It’s also good for erosion control. The flowers of bugleweed are normally bluish to purple but they can be found in white as well. And in addition to the traditional green foliage, this ground cover can also provide the landscape with stunning copper or purple-colored foliage too, making it great for adding year-round interest.  

PLANTING TIPS: Ajuga ground cover spreads through runners, and as a member of the mint family, it can get out of control without proper care. However, when placed in strategic locations, its quick growth and mat-forming trait can provide instant coverage with only a few plants. One good way to keep this jewel in bounds is by enclosing your garden beds with edging. Another way, which I’ve found to be useful, is by planting ajuga plants in a somewhat sunny area. Ajuga is typically grown in shady locations but will thrive just as well in the sun, albeit more slowly, making it much easier to control. The plant also likes fairly moist soil but is remarkably adaptable and will even tolerate a little drought.  Once established, ajuga plants requires little care. Unless it’s really dry, ajuga can usually sustain itself with normal rainfall and there’s no need to fertilize this plant. Of course, if it’s located in the sun, you may need to water it more often.


Catmint~

ABOUT THIS PLANT:Related to catnip, but much showier, catmints (Nepeta) are easy to grow perennials that not only have flowers in shades of purple-blue, pink and white, but gray-green foliage that remains attractive throughout the growing season as well.The most familiar catmints are those with purple-blue flowers that bloom heavily in early summer. These come in a range of heights, from a foot tall up to as much as 3-4 feet tall, making them useful in many garden settings, including flower borders, rock gardens, and edging. A classic combination is to grow them with hybrid tea roses to cover the "bare knees" of the rose bushes and complement the many shades of rose blossoms with their soft blue flowers.But there are also catmints with pale pink or white flowers, even one uncommon species with yellow flowers. All make great bee and butterfly attracting plants. 

PLANTING TIPS:Most catmints prefer full sun and well-drained, not overly fertile soil, although plants in hot summer areas do well with some afternoon shade. Established plants are quite drought tolerant.Container grown plants can be set out throughout the growing season. Space smaller cultivars 18-24 inches apart; taller varieties should be set about 30 inches apart. Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.

CARE:Shear back plants by one-third after their first flush of bloom is past to neaten plants and encourage a second flush of flowers later in the summer. Keep plants vigorous by dividing every 3-4 years in spring or early fall. Give newly set out or divided plants regular watering until established. While not as enticing to cats as true catnip, felines may still try to roll on catmints. If there are cats around, it's a good idea to protect young plants for a while with a dome made out of chicken wire. An annual layer of compost in fall or spring should provide catmint with all the nutrients it needs.


Chives~

ABOUT THIS PLANT:The leaves of chives are used in all kinds of sauces and salads to lend a delicate onion flavor. Flat-leaved garlic chives combine the flavor of onion and garlic.Once you plant chives in your garden, chances are you'll always have them. Chives are hardy perennial plants and can be easily dug up and divided when they get too large. Plus, the attractive purple flowers scatter their seeds, so you likely see numerous chive seedlings each spring.

PLANTING TIPS:Choose an area in full sun to part shade. Chives prefer rich soil and will tolerate either moist or dry conditions.Start plants from seed, purchase a plant or two, or dig up part of a clump from a neighbor's garden. If seeding, plant in mid-to-late spring. Sow in clusters 1 to 1-1/2 feet apart.

CARE:Water young plants throughout the growing season. Once established, mature chive plants need minimal care. Remove flowers after they bloom to prevent plants from self-sowing. Small clumps of chives potted in the fall will grow indoors. Divide the plants every three or four years.You can begin harvesting about six weeks after planting or as soon as established plants resume growth in the spring. As you need leaves, cut the outer ones right back to the base. Use them fresh or frozen; they do not retain their flavor well when dried.


Chokecherry~

ABOUT THIS PLANT:  So, what is a chokecherry? Growing chokecherry trees are large suckering shrubs (small trees) that are indigenous to the Southeastern United States but may be grown as a perennial landscape specimen elsewhere. Prunus viginiana can attain heights of up to 41 feet tall with a canopy of 28 feet across; of course, this is extremely rare and generally the plant can be maintained to a size of about 12 feet tall by 10 feet wide. Chokecherry trees bear 3- to 6-inch long creamy white blooms, which become dark red fleshy fruit, maturing into a mature purple black with a pit in the center. This fruit is used to make jams, jellies, syrups and wines. The bark has at times been used to flavor cough syrups. Native Americans utilized the bark extract as a cure for diarrhea. Fruit from growing chokecherry trees was added to pemmican and used to treat canker sores and cold sores. Leaves and twigs were steeped to create a tea to ease colds and rheumatism while the wood of the chokecherry was made into arrows, bows and pipe stems.

PLANTING TIPS:   Chokecherry is commonly used as a windbreak on farms, riparian plantings, and for highway beautification. Due to its suckering habitat (and potential toxicity), care should be take when determining where to plant chokecherries. In the garden landscape, chokecherry may be utilized as a screen or in mass plantings, being aware of its propensity for suckering and multiplying. Also, keep in mind that deer love to graze on chokecherry trees, so if you don’t want deer, you don’t want chokecherry trees. As a landscape planting, you can grow and harvest chokecherry fruit in the fall; the later the reaping, the sweeter the fruit. Remove the toxic stems and leaves when cleaning the berries and do not crush the seeds when cooking or juice extracting. Thus, common sense would tell you not to put the berries in the blender!

Columbine ~

ABOUT THIS PLANT:With beautiful bell-shaped flowers, columbine is an excellent garden perennial with many colorful hybrid varieties to choose from.Columbine (also known as Granny's bonnet) is known for its distinctive, bell-shaped, spurred flowers, which bloom from mid-spring to early summer. Though individual plants are short-lived, lasting only two to three years, columbine self-seeds prolifically and will persist in the garden with volunteer seedlings. With a wide choice of hybrid varieties, colors range from light pastels to bright yellow, red, orange and purple selections. The plant foliage is has an attractive lacey appearance.
PLANTING TIPS:Columbine grows best in full sun and well-drained, fertile soil. For most climates, columbine grows best in partial shade; however, in warmer climates like Florida and Southern California, less sun and more shade is preferred.Plant in spring, spacing plants 1 to 3 feet apart, depending on the variety. Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.
CARE:Columbine is prone to a fungal disease called powdery mildew. The spores spread through splashing water and travel on wind currents to infect other plants. Once established,
powdery mildew is difficult to control. Most fungal diseases develop during rainy, wet weather, but powdery mildew develops when daytime temperatures are warm and nights are cool. The disease is not dependent on water on the leaves. You can help your columbines resist the disease by cutting back the affected plant parts (down to ground level if necessary), providing afternoon sunshine, and lots of air circulation in and around the plants. One of the most common pest on columbine is leaf miner. These fly larvae feed inside the leaf. You'll see their damage as light-colored, winding tunnels on the leaf surfaces. Cut off and destroy all infested foliage after plants have bloomed; the new leaves that regrow later in the season will be miner-free. 

Coneflower ~
ABOUT THIS PLANT: Widely renowned as a medicinal plant, coneflowers are a long-flowering perennial for borders, wildflower meadows, and prairie gardens.  Blooming midsummer to fall, the plants are relatively drought-tolerant and rarely bothered by pests.  The flowers are a magnet for butterflies, and the seeds in the dried flower heads attract songbirds.  Flower colors include rose, purple, pink, and white, plus a new orange variety.  Plants grow 2-4 feet tall, depending on the variety.  Coneflowers multiply readily, tolerate dry soil, attract butterflies and are deer resistant.
PLANTING TIPS:  Select a site with full sun to light shade and well-drained soil.  Plant in spring, spacing plants 1-3 feet apart, depending on the variety.  Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12-15 inches, then mix in a 2-4 inch layer of compost.  Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in.  Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface.  Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently.  Water thoroughly.
CARE:  Apply a thin layer of compost each spring, followed by a 2 inch layer of mulch to retain moisure and control weeds.  Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week.  Deadhead spent flowers to extend flower period, but leave late-season flowers on the plants to mature, the seedheads will attract birds.  Divide plants every 3-4 years as new growth begins in the spring, liftinng plants and dividing them into clumps.

Coral Bells ~
ABOUT THIS PLANT:  Also known as coral bells or alumroot, heucheras are cold hardy in zones 4 to 9; some cultivars can tolerate the heat and humidity in zone 11. Graceful, bell-shaped flower clusters open in late spring, carried on spikes that grow about two feet tall.

The foliage of these plants is probably their most striking feature. The leaves are often large and heart-shaped or rounded, and many are variegated or ruffled. Because heucheras are evergreen, they bring year-round interest to the garden, even under a dusting of snow.

PLANTING TIPS:  

The plants prefer partial shade, but can take more sun in cold climates. Give them well-drained, moist, rich soil that’s neutral to slightly acidic, with a pH of 6.0 to 7.0.  Other than keeping them regularly watered during their first year of growth, heucheras don’t require much care. Simply cut off the stalks after the flowers are finished, to help the plant put more energy into leaf production. Divide heuchera clumps as needed, or every three or four years. Deadhead the flowers, to promote more blooms, which may continue into summer. If you wish, prune the foliage back in early spring, so new growth won’t be crowded. Few pests or diseases bother these deer-resistant beauties, although leaf scorch can be a problem in hot, full sun. Watch for soil heave in changing temperatures; this happens when the ground freezes and thaws, eventually pushing roots up out of the ground. Keeping the plants well mulched can help prevent this from happening.








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