Paradise Memorial Garden, Pueblo West

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  • DayLily
    DayLily
  • Feather Reed Grass
    Feather Reed Grass
  • Iris
    Iris
  • Lamb's Ear
    Lamb's Ear
  • Lilac
    Lilac
  • Ninebark
    Ninebark

Daylily~

ABOUT THIS PLANT:Few plants are as rugged, widely adapted, or versatile as daylilies. And with more than 13,000 cultivars available, there's a size and flower color for every garden.Plant breeders continue to expand the color palette available in daylilies, which now includes yellow, orange, red, white, and purple flowers. Varieties with muliticolored blooms, often with a contrasting "eye," or center, are increasingly popular. Most daylilies have a distinct, three- to four-week bloom period in early to late summer, although some varieties continue to bloom sporadically all season long. Individual flowers last just one day but new ones open daily for the duration of the bloom time. Foliage height ranges from 1 to 4 feet, depending on variety. Flower stalks on the tallest varieties can reach 6 feet. Flowers are edible.
PLANTING TIPS:Select a site with full sun to light shade and well-drained soil. In areas with hot summers, light afternoon shade will keep brightly colored flowers from fading.Plant in spring, spacing plants 1 to 3 feet apart, depending on the variety. Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water
thoroughly.
CARE:Apply a thin layer of compost each spring, followed by a 2-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. Avoid excessive fertilizing as this will inhibit flower production. Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. Remove individual spent flowers daily and cut back flower stalks once all flowers have gone by. Divide plants every three to four years as new growth begins in the spring, lifting plants and dividing them into clumps.

Fernbush~
ABOUT THIS PLANT: sometimes also known as Desert Sweet, the Fernbush is a native plant worthy of our admiration. It has so many wonderful attributes that make it an essential part of any low-water landscape. It is a naturally tidy-growing woody plant with a soft rounded shape that is beautiful in and out of flower. Many folks who don't know it and see the bush in bloom remark it looks like a "summer lilac." And indeed it does. The voluptuous white flower spikes cover the plant in mid-summer, when most other flowering trees and shrubs have finished blooming months prior.

Native bees, bumblebees, honeybees, moths and butterflies love the nectar-rich flowers. And many beneficial insects are associated with Fernbush. But unlike lilacs that have little to offer after blooming, Fernbush flowers are followed by attractive bronze seed heads that adorn the plants through winter, catching the snow and providing pleasing muted-brown color in the dormant seasons. Small seed-eating birds also feed on its copious seed set in the fall.

PLANTING TIPS: This is a tough, durable plant. It is a robust grower all across the western US and Great Plains. It thrives in most soil types and does well when irrigated with drip irrigation systems (not the case for some native shrubs). And it takes no pruning to keep it looking nice and tidy. Just deadhead the old seed heads in early spring.  Fernbush is very cold hardy and gets a good jump on next growing season by planting it in the fall. This establishes its root system and lets it grow larger the first year than the same size plant planted in spring.


Grasses~(Feather Reed, Blue Grama)
ABOUT THIS PLANT:Ornamental grasses add grace and motion to the garden with straplike foliage that sways in the gentlest breeze. The fluffy flowers and seed heads on many varieties last throughout the winter, attracting birds and adding winter interest to the garden.The term ornamental grasses encompasses many species with different textures, sizes, colors, and flower forms. Foliage and flower colors include red, pink, purple, tan, and white, in addition to all hues of green. Most types bloom in midsummer; however, dried seed heads can remain on plant all winter. Plants grow 1' to 9' tall, depending on the variety, and can be used as ground covers, in containers, in borders, or to screen a fence or view. Some species can be invasive.
PLANTING TIPS:Most grasses prefer full sun to light shade and well-drained soil. Some types tolerate other conditions.Plant in spring, spacing plants 1 to 3 feet apart, depending on the variety. Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of
12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.
CARE:Apply a thin layer of compost each spring, followed by a 2-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. Cut back the plant in late winter to stimulate new growth. Some species need dividing every 3 to 4 years to keep the plants vigorous. Taller species, such as fountain grass, may need staking.

Iris~
ABOUT THIS PLANT:With their swordlike leaves and showy flowers, bearded iris are an eye-catching addition to any garden. They're easy to plant, require minimum care, and readily multiply. Dwarf varieties make attractive edging.Bearded iris are available in a wide variety of flower colors, including pink, blue, red, yellow, and purple. They bloom in early summer, with some varieties reblooming later in the summer. They grow from 8 inches to 4 feet tall, depending on variety. The flowers are lovely in bouquets, and the foliage remains attractive even after flowers have faded. Unfortunately, the plants are susceptible to borers, so check the rhizomes (fleshy roots) yearly for holes, discarding any infested ones.
PLANTING TIPS:Select a site with full sun and well-drained soil.Plant bearded iris in mid summer to early fall, spacing plants 1 to 2 feet apart, depending on variety. Excellent soil drainage is a must. Prepare garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. If planting a rhizome (fleshy root), dig a shallow hole 10 inches in diameter and 4 inches deep. Make a ridge of soil down the middle and place the rhizome on the ridge, spreading roots down both sides. Fill the hole with soil, and firm it gently. In clay soil, the top of the rhizome should be exposed. In sandy soil, rhizomes can be buried with a thin layer of soil. If planting container-grown plants, set the plant so the rhizome is at the soil surface. Water thoroughly.
CARE:Apply a thin layer of compost around the base of plants each spring, leaving the
rhizome (fleshy root) exposed. As flowers fade, cut back the flower stalks to the base of the plant. To encourage a second bloom on reblooming varieties, promptly remove faded flowers and maintain consistent watering throughout the summer. In autumn, trim away dead foliage and prune back healthy leaves to a height of 4 to 5 inches. Once the soil has frozen, apply a layer of mulch to help prevent roots from heaving out of the soil during alternate freezing and thawing. If heaving occurs, don't try to force plants back into the soil. Instead, cover rhizomes and exposed roots with soil. Divide bearded iris every 4 to 5 years, preferably in late summer. Each division should have one or two leaf fans. Older rhizomes that have few white feeding roots should be discarded.

Lamb's Ears ~

ABOUT THIS PLANT:A hardy perennial most known for its thick woolly leaves, not its flowers.Lamb's Ears is a very hardy and strong-growing perennial, with thick white-wooly foliage, valued as a dense, low growing, spreading bedding plant in the landscape. Lamb's Ears works well when filling an area of your landscape and as a border perennial, with pink-purple flower spikes during the summer season. The foliage provides striking silvery color and unique velvety soft textural qualities.Stachys byzantina 'Helen von Stein', also known as 'Big Ears' has attractive and fragrant foliage and rarely sends up flower spikes.Stachys byzantina 'Silver Carpet'is most known for its strikingly attractive silvery-green leaves, but rarely blooms.
PLANTING TIPS:The plant grows best in full sun and well-drained soil and can tolerate poor-soil conditions. Stachys byzantina is best grown in zones 4-7.Plant in spring, spacing plants 1 to 3 feet apart, depending on the variety. Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.
CARE:Too much standing water captured within the leaves can result in leaf rot. Avoid this
condition by dividing established dense growth. Divide plants every 3 to 4 years as new growth begins in the spring, lifting plants and dividing them into clumps. Cut back flowering stems close to ground level after they have finished blooming and they will sprout healthy new stems and leaves. An annual shearing renews the plant, removes all the dead leaves, and makes this plant grow neat and compact. Apply a thin layer of compost each spring, followed by a 2-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds.

Lilacs ~

ABOUT THIS PLANT:Classic spring-flowering shrubs, lilacs produce abundant, colorful flower clusters with a sweet, memorable fragrance.Lilacs are hardy, easy care plants, and the fragrant flowers are good for cutting and attractive to butterflies. Flower colors include blue, lavender, pink, red, purple, yellow, and white, depending on the variety. Most lilacs grows 5 to 15 feet tall and wide, depending on variety. Lilacs are easy care/low maintenance, fragrant, attract butterflies and are great for cut flowers.

PLANTING TIPS:Select a site with full sun and moist, well-drained soil.Plant in spring or fall. Space plants 5 to 15 feet apart, depending on variety. Dig a hole only as deep as the root ball and 2 to 3 times as wide. If your soil is in very poor condition, amend the soil you've removed from the hole with a small amount of compost. Otherwise don't amend it at all. Carefully remove the plant from the container and set it in the hole. Fill the hole half full with soil, then water it well to settle the soil and eliminate air pockets. Let the water drain, then fill the remainder of hole with soil and water thoroughly.

CARE:Apply a layer of compost under the plant each spring, followed by a 2-inch layer of

mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. Prune lilacs immediately after flowering, removing dead and broken branches, then cutting back as necessary to maintain the desired size and shape. Overgrown lilacs can be pruned back by as much as one third. 

Ninebark ~

ABOUT THIS PLANT:A deciduous shrub with attractive foliage, peeling bark and corymbs of white cup-shaped flowers.Ninebark grows 6 to 10 feet tall and wide, in zones 2-8. The white , cup-shaped flower heads are attractive to birds, bees and butterflies. Ninebark is drought tolerant, requires little maintenance and is suitable for xeriscaping.Dart's golden ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius 'Dart's golden') - is a more compact shrub with light striking yellow spring foliage fading to a chartreuse yellow-green in summer. It has showy white flowering clusters in early summer and fantastic golden-orange fall color.Diabolo ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' )is well known for its rich purple foliage. Its white flowers in late spring to early summer blooms make a distinctive visual contrast to the dark purple foliage.
PLANTING TIPS:Ninebark grows best in acidic, well-drained soil in full sun to partial shade, but is adaptable to many soil conditions.Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or
tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.
CARE:Water regularly until established. After it's established, ninebark is drought-tolerant. You can propagate from hardwood cuttings. Established shrubs require annual pruning to maintain their shape. Prune early each spring by removing some of the oldest branches by cutting them off at the base. Do not ingest this plant, as all parts of the ninebark are known to be poisonous.



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